Six Forks Corridor Draft Plan

The Six Forks Road corridor in a way defines a unique sense of place with enhanced fluidity of movement, environmental sensitivity, and connectivity for residents, workers, students, and visitors using transportation modes of all types, including cars, bikes, pedestrian, and public transit. Six Forks Road is also a major transportation corridor that connects to the 1-440 beltline and is planned for future widening. Could the corridor relate better to the surrounding uses? Gives us your thoughts on the draft corridor study.
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City of Raleigh Poll:
Master Plan Layout – What do you like, dislike, or think is missing from the draft master plan? View
Poll Closed
Paul NevillWould like planners to consider connecting existing greenway path from Northclift/Optimist Park area to Six Forks, following natural creek path towards Loft Lane.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Gary PosterI like the trees, sidewalks, and bike paths. Crossing Six Forks as a pedestrian is currently not welcoming around the area of North Hills, especially for children. I'm not clear on how this plan will significantly improve that experience, and I would like to make it better.

I've seen casual discussions about pedestrian tunnels and bridges, which might be nice, but might also be impractical. Perhaps simply wider pedestrian crossings than we have now would provide a safer feel?

I see the "potential pedestrian grade separation" approximately in the area I'm thinking of. I don't understand why that's not at an intersection, but it might be the kind of thing I am hoping for.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
RobertSee my overall comments above - one thing missing is connections along any route to existing city park pathways - can see this moving people from other parts of the city to the corridor without the use of a car (bikes and walkers) - which in effect could and should mean you take a lane of traffic away from the cars and give it to the bikes and walkers which will encourage public transport and the above....
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Brant Guillorybetter medians to help control folks making awkward left-turns across traffic into driveways that are pointed opposite to the way they're trying to drive
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Steven GoodridgeI don't think six-laning this road is a good idea given the increased pedestrian-oriented urban development happening on both sides. I think prioritizing thru commuter traffic ins such a away will detract from the value of this location as a destination.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
BRUISERthe biggest I see is increasing the road to a 6 lane road. this will bring more traffic to the area, this will not slow the traffic, but it will slowly turn six forks rd into a glenwood ave with cars goign way faster then the need with one large area being right in front of carroll middle school and St Timothy.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
vanntaylor3@gmail.comBus transit lanes
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Steven GoodridgeAs a lifelong commuter/utility cyclist, I would prefer to ride on the roadway rather than behind a curb where I would face more junction hazards on this high-junction-density corridor. Please use shared lane markings in the center of the right hand thru lane and bicycles may use full lane signage to remind motorists and bicyclists that bicyclists are entitled to use the normal travel lane regardless of what kind of sidepath is constructed.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Jessica HallSafe, separate bike lanes, sidewalks, bus turn outs and covered bus shelters would be wonderful additions to the area that I'd love to see and would get great use.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
kristydactylBe sure to maintain safe bicycle crossings and signalization through intersections!
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
lars716Make sure bus lanes are factored into the plan for future public transit expansion
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Matthew MoormanThe master plan is on target. John Kane's doing his thing at the south end of the study area--adding value to the area and to the city as a whole, while an improved connection (not just for cars, but for public transit, bikes and pedestrians as well) to the northern neighborhoods is the first step in changing their characters from pure low-density suburban to a more urbane neighborhood feel. This Six Forks plan could very well set the tone for how the rest of the city is developed in the years to come, and would make Raleigh a truly unique urban experience for the southeast and for the country.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
mollymstuartA strong, safe, visible pedestrian and bicycle connection across 440.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Dana McCallI would rather see a bikeway on the curb than a row of trees. Keep bikes off of the streets.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Scott SimmonsNo dedicated transit lane is an issue. We should be prioritizing transit over cars. Bus rapid transit would be perfect solution for this corridor into downtown.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
NeighborBus turn-outs are desirable along the corridor
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
SharonFeltongreat plan love it
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
The streetscape recommendation is to move between urban and parkway boulevards along the corridor, do you agree with the plan? View
Yes
98%
No
3%
Poll Closed | 80 Responses
Robertrequire bldgs. to be built closer to the proposed walkways - we don't need parking lots next to the street - actually if you get people out to walk and ride/rent a bike - you don't need parking at all and you can build greater density.
Reply Flag 1 Agree2 years ago
Susannah Coxi appreciate the effort at beautification and being friendly to pedestrians and bikes. the same should be done for capital blvd.
Reply Flag 1 Agree2 years ago
brianroach4We have so many people moving to the Triangle for jobs and education that any proactive measures we can take to mitigate traffic congestion we need to implement
Reply Flag 1 Agree2 years ago
Matthew MoormanI think some nice, linear parks along the parkway section of Six Forks would be a galvanizing and defining feature of Midtown Raleigh. Such open space would belay the worries of NIMBY's and would create an amazing framework for future, responsible (yet more dense) development along that section of the corridor.
Reply Flag 1 Agree2 years ago
mollymstuartThe parkway sections should be planned or constructed with future infill urbanization in mind to create a continuous corridor that may not be justified today.
Reply Flag 1 Agree2 years ago
Gladys MasonMoorman (below) makes an excellent recommendation to include linear parks along Six Forks. This area needs more green space with more opportunities for rain water to find its' way into the ground. It is very concerning that recently many of the mature trees in the area have been cut down. I thought Raleigh had rules in place to protect the mature trees and improve the water runoff systems, but I'm not sure we are seeing enough of this being practiced along Six Forks Road, even with this optimist plan. Bruiser's) statement (below) is a very valid concern!
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
BRUISERAfter the last meeting and hearing what some of the city employees stated about certain areas wanting to update there land (think food lion, and old IBM building areas ) what I see is that the developers want to expand six fords rd so they can also cash in on the money that North Hills ( Kane ) is getting from developing what they did.. This 6 lane wideing project will just make the road like glenwood ave and others where cars are speeding at much more rapid pace then they already do. this does not slow the flow the traffic or reduce the traffic jams that the designers are trying to say it will. This will increase the amount of traffic to the area. this plan is almost as bad as the idea to put in a 2 lane roundabout on hillsborough street.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
NeighborThe new Raleigh zoning guidelines should be followed along the Six Forks Road Corridor. It is preferred that buildings be no taller than 5 stories. It is desirable that no building be taller than 10 stories. Absolutely, No building should be taller than 20 stories.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
Do you have any other general comments on the Draft Plan? View
Poll Closed
Paul NevillReducing the number of Transit stops (CAT Route #8) and increasing the transit stop facilities is a good, simple improvement. This can be done quickly, cheaply, and regardless of the final design of the Project.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Adam ChasenThis area has the potential to provide a great balance of the benefits of a walk-able and bike-able urban area while still being predominantly moderate residential area which will encourage people to get out of their cars and engage with the city, space, and one another! Very exciting!
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Gary PosterI was excited to see the possibility of incorporating a significant piece of public art in the draft plan.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
RobertStop talking about it and get moving - put it into action
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Steven GoodridgeI don't think six-laning this road is a good idea given the increased pedestrian-oriented urban development happening on both sides. I think prioritizing through commuter traffic in such a way will detract from the area's value as a destination.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
StevenMy main concern is that the speed limit along here is reasonable and safe. If nothing else from the plan makes it, then the design elements that slow the traffic down to around 20mph should remain. Also, a greenway trail connector from the the Crabtree Creek Greenway that cuts through North Hills Park would go a long way to increase bicycle access, IMHO. Thanks!
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
BRUISERI still do not understand why the city wants to increase the traffic flow along six forks rd between to schools, Carroll and St. Timothy and make this a 6 lane rd? If you increase the width of the road to 6 lanes(plus turn lanes) you are not controlling the traffic you are increasing the traffic. If you drive Six forks rd a lot you will see the heavy traffic is during rush hr. so for about 2.5hrs in the morning and 2.5 hrs in the evening but the rest of the time and all week you do not have the heavy traffic flow like this planning group is trying to suggest. At one the public meetings they had last year the question was asked who wanted 6 lanes of traffic on six forks rd and 75% of the room raised there hand opposing six lanes and yet all we see are designs showing 6 lanes.. is the city actually listening to the public or have then been set wanting 6 lanes the entire time and all the meetings were a scam?
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Evan BrighamKeep all Cross Section elements! No compromise!
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
69thunderbirdhope the billion dollar bonds arent spent on too much analysis, studies , graphic designs, etc and some money is left for construction
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Matthew MoormanCan't wait to see it in action! Let's meet back in 10 years to see how far we've come.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
NeighborThis could be a beautiful thing.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
scollins888I really appreciate First Citizens partnering with this study by providing meeting space.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
SharonFeltonLets make it happen.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
What element of the general street sections do you think is most important? View
Bike lanes/bicycle accommodations
64%
Sidewalk/pedestrian accommodations
19%
Installation of a median
6%
Consistent number of street lanes
4%
Safer and more numerous crosswalks
4%
Landscape/aesthetic design
3%
More traffic signals at intersections
1%
Poll Closed | 119 Responses
Paul NevillSeparate sidewalk zones and bike zones - apart from vehicle traffic lanes - are the best and safest options...if cross section space is available.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Tony Vincent Diaz III am for the inclusion of cyclist lanes since there is little support in the urban areas of Northern Raleigh. Despite the attempts at lanes on the road (think St. Mary's St between Glenwood and Six Forks) I'm not particularly comfortable traveling that route. Giving a separate lane to cyclists will help avoid the fiasco going on at NCSU where students skip the marked lanes entirely and plow right through the sidewalks between pedestrians.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
RobertYou should visit Warsaw Poland - what you have planned here is exactly what they have installed along all their major blvds. They have room for both walkers and bikers - trees and benches - BUT GET RID OF THE OVERHEAD POWERLINES! They are an eyesore! One thing that is so awesome about Poland's transport is that along these roads, there are bikes to rent for less than $3 a 1/2 day - drop offs throughout the city - connections to the city parks
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Adam RobinsonThis plan seems like it would make it easier and more pleasant to bike as a mode of transportation. I feel limited to biking within the downtown area or on small neighborhood streets such as those that border Hillsborough Street. I'd bike that street IF the bike lanes connected to downtown or to the greenway. The greenway has become my path for biking to another part of Raleigh.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
brianroach4Why is biking not a supported means of transportation? Six Forks has so many amenities near great neighbrohoods and I would like to help reduce congestion by getting on my bike but it just not feel safe
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Christina SerafinoSix Forks Road traffic gets throttled at intersections where the traffic lane turns into a turn lane, such as the intersection near Carroll Middle School as well as on the southern side of 440.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Jeremy DeGrootI wish we could have ranked these items. I voted bike accommodations most important, but pedestrian accommodations and safe crossings are also critical!
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Bradford WestReally like the separated bike lane behind planted buffer strip. If what is being proposed looks like the rendering, then I'm all for it.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Karen Mitchell TurnerMore sidewalk's,
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Karen Mitchell TurnerMore Pedestrian Friendly with
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Jessica WinebrennerThe ability to bike safely between downtown and North Hills would add a tremendous benefit to people living in either area, and would draw the two together in a way that lets people travel easily and safely between the two, expanding work, dining and shopping options. I bike from downtown to North Hills now and it is difficult as many streets just don't have bike lanes.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Nathan MohsI think making residents walk across Six Forks Rd. to access shopping, restaurants, grocery, etc. is not conducive to the walkable vision of North Hills. It is an insanely busy and large intersection to cross, and I am sure the plenty of people drive from one side to the other. How about a pedestrian bridge or tunnel?
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Eric MorrowBike lanes for sure! People first please.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
BRUISERI still do not understand why the city wants to increase the traffic flow along six forks rd between to schools, Carroll and St. Timothy and make this a 6 lane rd? If you increase the width of the road to 6 lanes(plus turn lanes) you are not controlling the traffic you are increasing the traffic. If you drive Six forks rd a lot you will see the heavy traffic is during rush hr. so for about 2.5hrs in the morning and 2.5 hrs in the evening but the rest of the time and all week you do not have the heavy traffic flow like this planning group is trying to suggest. At one the public meetings they had last year the question was asked who wanted 6 lanes of traffic on six forks rd and 75% of the room raised there hand opposing six lanes and yet all we see are designs showing 6 lanes.. is the city actually listening to the public or have then been set wanting 6 lanes the entire time and all the meetings were a scam?
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Joseph AliI live on Windel Drive. It is getting more and more difficult ( and dangerous) to get onto Six Forks Road with the increase in traffic. The proposed traffic light would be most welcome.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Todd SingletonMake it just like the corridor through Centennial campus with more lanes. The sidewalks and bike paths do not have to be separate if they are asphalt like Greenway trails.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Hatchell.josh@gmail.comBike lanes/greenway connections are a valuable asset. Especially in this area, they are needed to make the alternate means of transportation safer for all parties. We need more of a connected bikeway in this area to connect to the thriving downtown area and the residential areas of north raleigh.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
todd.berger001Bike lanes on the road-way as well as pedestrian and bike paths for families to utilize while accessing the amenities of the surrounding area.
Buffer zones for pedestrians.
connectivity to the surrounding area with bike lanes and buffered pedestrian pathways, making it accessible, by alternative transportation, from the neighborhoods.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
vanntaylor3@gmail.comBicycle lanes should be added
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Patrick O'NeilPedestrian & bike lanes absolutely essential. Aesthetic design becomes really important for making it a valuable community.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Cass ChisholmBike lanes at North Hills would be very useful as would a pedestrian bridge over Six Forks.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Steven GoodridgeThe number of driveways and other junctions on Six Forks will be problematic for separated bikeways aka "sidepaths." Two-way separated bikeways are especially hazardous where junction density is high, because contra-flow cyclists on the separated bikeway will be several times more likely to experience car-bike collisions compared to correct-direction bicyclists on the roadway. Shared lane markings in the center of the right hand thru lane, plus "Bicycles May Use Full Lane" markings should be used to accommodate bicycle commuters and other serious cyclists who will prefer not to ride behind the curb on this corridor. Alternatively, wide bike lanes with proper right turn only lanes and merge/weave sections (per MUTCD) at intersection approaches could be used, but this may require more space than is available.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Doug BrownBike-ways should not be viewed as "optional". Many individuals and families would love a safe place to ride their bikes in this very traffic congested area. Cutting down on more cars on the roadways is a good thing. Ride a bike.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Matthew MoormanThe creation of pedestrian amenities not only along the Six Forks corridor, but also connecting with the surrounding neighborhoods, would do more to improve the perceived safety and "placesness" of this area than just about any other feature of the plan (with the exception of a consolidated bus stop system with improved stops).
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Dana McCallCenter turn lanes invite head-on traffic, improper merging, and no refuge for pedestrians. I love the medians on suburban parkways in Cary. They keep moving traffic focused on fewer possible disturbances and make crossing safer for pedestrians.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
NeighborMaintain six travel lanes the whole way. Do not reduce below the 11-foot lane widths. The median is highly desirable. Sidewalks are a given, bike-ways are optional. The suggested cross-walks are needed. Landscaping is desirable.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
Do you agree with the proposed Future Land Use designations, zoning districts, building heights, and frontages? View
Agree
89%
Disagree
11%
Poll Closed | 36 Responses
RobertYou want folks to utilize the bikes and walkways - you need higher density - build taller along the major blvds of the city -
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
BRUISEReverything in this study or proposed planning is to help the developers in the area and not the folks that live and travel in this area directly affected.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
Matthew MoormanGreat! Step-down, incremental development. The Six Forks/Millbrook intersection and surrounding area is in desperate need of infill, greyfield development, and the proposed zoning is both appropriate and significant enough to create a new feel for the area.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago
NeighborThe new Raleigh zoning guidelines should be followed along the Six Forks Road Corridor. It is preferred that buildings be no taller than 5 stories. Buildings at North Hills should be restricted to a maximum height of 10 stories or less.
Reply Flag Agree2 years ago