2030 Comprehensive Plan Update

The City of Raleigh is currently updating the 2030 Comprehensive Plan. Periodic updates help to keep the plan current with emerging trends and community desires. The draft update integrates and coordinates the plans of many city departments. Community input is key. We thank you for taking the time to respond to a few question related to four focus areas: Sustainability, Development Transitions, Housing, and Transportation. For more information about the current 2030 Comprehensive Plan and the update process, please see the project page.

To answer questions you will need to login to participate. You can login using Facebook, Twitter, Google or create an account. 

City of Raleigh Poll:
2. Did you attend 1 or more of the 5 public meetings during June and July about the 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update? Please choose all that apply.
Did not attend a meeting.
85%
Transportation on June 27 at Method Road Community Park.
7%
Resilience on June 7 at Carolina Pines Community Center.
5%
Sustainability on July 11 at Durant Nature Preserve.
5%
Housing on June 14 at Tarboro Road Community Center.
3%
Transitions on June 20 at Marsh Creek Community Center.
3%
Closed to responses | 100 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
3. Did you participate in the public process that resulted in the 2009 adoption of the 2030 Comprehensive Plan? Please choose one.
No.
65%
Yes.
21%
I'm not sure or don't remember.
14%
Closed to responses | 115 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
4. How long have you lived in Raleigh? Please choose one.
More than 10 years.
66%
Between 5 and 10 years.
16%
Less than 5 years.
15%
Work or visit regularly, but do not live in Raleigh.
4%
Closed to responses | 114 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
5. How old are you? Please choose one.
Between 35 and 65.
55%
Between 18 and 35.
30%
Over 65.
15%
Under 18.
0%
Closed to responses | 114 Responses

Sustainability

City of Raleigh Poll:
6. Should a property owner’s access to sunlight for solar panels be protected? Please choose one.
Yes.
65%
No.
24%
No opinion.
10%
Closed to responses | 115 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
6a. If yes, would you be in favor of regulating the height or placement of homes in your neighborhood? Please choose one.
Yes.
65%
No.
35%
Closed to responses | 103 Responses

Transitions

City of Raleigh Poll:
7. Should buildings in General areas be taller than Edge areas but not as tall as Core/Transit areas?

Current policy provides height guidance based on three types of areas:

1. Edge areas are located within 150 feet of a residential area and would generally contain buildings of no more than 3- or 4-stories.

2. Core or Transit areas are located within the core of a mixed-use center or near high-frequency transit, for example downtown and along Capital Boulevard north of downtown, and could contain taller buildings between 5 to 20 stories.

3. General areas refer to all other locations.

Yes - this makes sense.
54%
No - this is too restrictive.
27%
No - this allows too much height.
19%
Closed to responses | 109 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
8. Do you agree with the following recommendation?

The draft Comprehensive Plan Update proposes to split the height allowance for properties that are part of multiple transition areas (Edge area 3-4 stories, Core/Transit 5-20 stories), allowing a building taller than in an Edge area, but shorter than in a Core/Transit area, as long as the height transitions down to the residential neighborhood.

For instance, a new building along South Saunders Street might be 5 stories along the transit route, as long as it is no more than 3 stories if it's adjacent to the neighborhood.

No - we should be encouraging additional height along these corridors to take advantage of transit investments, create more lively places, and provide more housing opportunities.
38%
Makes sense, split the difference.
34%
No - if it’s that close to a neighborhood, height should be kept to a minimum above existing homes.
28%
Closed to responses | 106 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
9. Should taller buildings be required to gradually increase in height away from the residential property? Please choose one.

For example, a new 100-foot-tall building, must locate most of the building height 60 feet away from the residential property, with the shorter part of the building closest to the residential property. (See diagram below)

Yes - this sounds reasonable.
47%
No - this is too restrictive.
28%
No - this allows too much height.
25%
Closed to responses | 107 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
10. Which statement below best captures your views regarding infill houses?

Many public meeting attendees requested that the Comprehensive Plan have stronger policies on the height and size of new houses in established neighborhoods.

New houses should more closely match the height and setbacks of nearby houses.
47%
New houses can be taller than adjacent houses, but this additional height should require greater setbacks from the property line.
28%
Standards for house height and setback should be the same for all lots in the zoning district, regardless of the height and setback of nearby houses.
25%
Closed to responses | 100 Responses

Housing

City of Raleigh Poll:
11. Which of the three top priorities for investments in affordable housing do you think is the most critical for Raleigh? Please choose one.
Increasing the supply of affordable housing.
57%
Promoting neighborhood revitalization.
28%
Ending and preventing homelessness.
15%
Closed to responses | 106 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
12. When the city builds new multi-family affordable housing developments, what location objective do you think is most important? Please choose one.
Near existing and proposed transit services.
49%
Near employment and commercial centers.
28%
Away from areas with high concentrations of subsidized housing.
15%
Near downtown Raleigh and identified revitalization areas.
8%
Closed to responses | 104 Responses

Transportation

City of Raleigh Poll:
13. What priorities are most important to implementing recommendations of the Wake County Transit Plan?

The plan calls for a network of frequent bus routes, a rail line from Raleigh to Durham and Garner, and a bus rapid transit network that would provide much faster bus service along key corridors.

Bus transit service should be increased, so that more places can be accessed by the network of frequent routes.
92%
Transit needs more dedicated infrastructure, so that transit vehicles are not delayed by congestion.
89%
Transit connections between suburban neighborhoods and employment centers should be increased.
86%
Commuter rail should be a priority, to connect Raleigh to the larger region.
84%
Transit capacity into downtown should be increased.
86%
Closed to responses | 76 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
14. Please share any other thoughts you have about the 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update.
Closed for Comments
City of Raleigh Poll:
1.What is your zip code?
New Meeting for 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update (3/22/2018)
Thursday, March 22, 2018 Add to calendar
New Meeting for 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update (3/28/2018)
Wednesday, March 28, 2018 Add to calendar