Blount St./Person St./Wake Forest Rd. Alternatives

Phase 1 implementation of the Blount/Person Corridor Study will add bike lanes on Wake Forest Rd. and Blount/Person Streets through the whole of Downtown, from Brookside Drive to Hoke Street. 

Three alternatives are being considered for the implementation through the Person St. Business District only (Person St. from Peace St. to Wake Forest Rd.):

  • One-way operation with bike lanes and parking – convert from 3 one-way northbound lanes to 2 one-way northbound lanes with a bike lane and up to 19 on-street parking spaces; traffic operates at levels-of-service A/B.
  • Two-way operation only – convert to two-way operation with 2 northbound and 1 southbound lanes, add sharrows in both directions, no new parking; traffic operates at levels-of-service A/B.
  • Two-way operation, bike lane, and parking – convert from 3 one-way northbound lanes to 1 lane in each direction with a northbound bike lane and up to 19 on-street parking spaces; traffic operates at levels-of-service D/E.
Translate
City of Raleigh Poll:
Which alternative do you prefer? (Select one)
Two-way operation, bike lane, and parking
56%
One-way operation with bike lanes and parking
37%
Two-way operation only
6%
Other (Explain in Comments)
1%
Poll Closed | 344 Responses
Alex SlaterAs a resident who enjoys the walkability of this area, my priority would be keeping automobile traffic down. Converting Person to 2-way traffic would seem to invite more traffic from cars. Improving the sidewalks and bike lanes would seem to encourage more visits to the area by foot or by bike. We should be planning for Peace St also to be overhauled and made more accessible on foot.
Reply Flag 8 Agreeone year ago
Matthew BookerTwo way, with a bike lane, solves so many problems. Much better for residents, and for traffic calming, and for pedestrians and bicyclists. Be bold, City of Raleigh!
Reply Flag 8 Agreeone year ago
Philip BernardTwo way operation with bike lane and parking is best because it will improve access to businesses and pedestrian safety. It will help calm traffic and give the business district more of a downtown neighborhood feel rather than a 2 lane race track. Wake Forest Road is going down to two lanes in each direction so it makes sense to make North Person Street two way as well. I'm interested in where parking spaces will go between curb cut on the west side of the street.
Reply Flag 7 Agreeone year ago
Pierre TongAccording to the report from the consultant, two-way traffic would increase travel times through the corridor more than the one-way road diet. (55/98 sec AM/PM for 2-way and 47/40 sec - AM/PM for 1-way). Also there would be parking lost with the two-way conversion to accommodate left turn lanes and the 2-way traffic. There are no significant drawbacks noted in the report for the 1-way road diet.
Reply Flag 6 Agreeone year ago
Brett MajorThere are many drawbacks to one-way roads. Traffic accidents are twice as likely on one-way roads than two-way roads. One-way roads are confusing to drivers - I hear honking several times a day because drivers are going the wrong way down Person Street.

Also, after converting one-way roads to two-way roads, research shows that property values and business revenue increase, so does pedestrian traffic.

Here are some articles about this issue:
http://www.citylab.com/commute/2013/01/case-against-one-way-streets/4549/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/04/17/why-one-way-streets-really-are-the-worst/
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Aranazazu LascurainFolks, the whole reason for one ways, historically, was to move traffic quickly OUT of downtown. Downtown has changed. We are now a vibrant community. where roads now need to be shared with bikes and pedestrians. One way streets are definitely built for speed.
Reply Flag 6 Agreeone year ago
tom edwardsIt seems like the traffic coming down person Street comes very quickly. I think the to a proposal would not only slow things down, but help the businesses and add to the vibrancy this downtown area.
Reply Flag 5 Agreeone year ago
Matthew BookerTwo-way with bike lane solves so many problems for residents, pedestrians and bicyclists. Be bold, City of Raleigh!
Reply Flag 5 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydI think the bike lanes should be reconsidered. Since they have been added to streets in the downtown area, they're rarely used by cyclists and automobile congestion has increased.
Reply Flag 5 Agreeone year ago
Bradford WestI believe two-way with added parking could potentially slow traffic down to safer speeds.

Historically, multi-lane one-way streets were used to rapidly move cars out of urban core areas with little regard to surrounding neighborhoods and pedestrian safety. Our priorities have changed and a two-way option better serves our desired goals.
Reply Flag 3 Agreeone year ago
Pierre TongThe one-way operation is working just fine - let's keep it that way and add bike lanes!
Reply Flag 3 Agreeone year ago
Kris Morley-NikfarThis is an urban environment. All modes should be prioritized equally rather than catering to vehicle level of service. Converting this to two-way traffic will slow vehicle movements and create a more comfortable and safe environment for pedestrians (some who happen to also be transit riders) and bicyclists.
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Andy O. LawrenceThe one way traffic creates a faster and more dangerous road in a very pedestrian oriented neighborhood. several cars parked along Person Street have been crashed into and mirrors knocked off primarily due to the speed. Two way traffic and bike lanes have a calming affect because it slows things down and provides easier navigation for people who are new to the area. i realize that one-way flow of traffic is an engineering solution but there are social and economic factors that greatly outweigh that one consideration. I love the area and think this would have a very positive impact.
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Barbara DollPerson and Blount St. provide an extremely important and major north-south travel corridor through downtown. Even though I am an Oakwood Resident, I don't believe this decision should be based on the personal preference of just the downtown residents and business owners. Thousands of commuters must drive to and from downtown daily to do work or business at the state government buildings and private offices in downtown. Providing efficient ingress and egress to downtown is important to maintaining this important element of downtown. If everyone is sitting at traffic lights stuck in traffic, it will NOT encourage any one to live, work, shop or do anything in town. It just makes people frustrated and causes smog and waste time. So, please ensure that you collect the comments and input of the commuters. I prefer to walk and bike whenever possible, however, there are many times that I need to get in and out of town efficiently. I depend on the Blount, Wake Forest and Person St. routes for this. So, I do not want to take an extra 10 or even 20 minutes to get where I need to go. Lanes were eliminated from Peace St. a few years ago and all that has done is provide horrible traffic congestion, especially during rush hour. Again, being stuck in traffic does not encourage me or anyone else to shop or eat. It actually reduces their time that they have available to spend enjoying these activities. Certain routes through town must be maintained to provide this efficient movement through town. Other streets can provide more pedestrian opportunities. If you eliminate this traffic flow, somehow it will have to be recovered through another toute. Do we want a bypass interstate that runs over top of these streets? Remeber, that was the plan for Historic Oakwood back in the 70's and we know that did not work out. It is a bad idea. It is better to use our existing streets in an efficient manner.
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Brett MajorThe City of Raleigh had people do a report on how this would increase traffic times. That report shows that the traffic times on Person and Blount streets would only increase 40-47 seconds (for the one-way diet) and 55-98 seconds (for the two-way diet). I agree that we need to make traffic flow and efficiency a priority downtown. But safety, walkability, parking, property value, accessibility, are all important as well (and two-way roads are great for these issues).
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Barbara DollI wrote this message in a hurry. I apologize for the typos and poor sentence construction! Hopefully, my point is clear regardless.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Lisa FinaldiWe need to create a safer pedestrian business district. The race track feeling needs to be addressed. The district has really changed so needs the transport model. Also the bike lane can help bring more people to the district that are not in cars. Parking is limited and anything we can do to move people out of their cars is helpful!
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Bart LeathermanThe one-way street here is awesome. Changing it seems like a waste. Would prefer to focus on business and residential access with more parking, increased pedestrian safety, and traffic calming with the existing one way patterns.
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Arthurb3Keep the thorough fare streets oneway - Person, Blount, Morgan, and Edenton Streets. Bury utilities and fixing streets and sidewalks should be the priority.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Daniel WhittakerAs a business owner located on Person St., who lives on Glascock St, a rider of bikes/boards, driver of streets, and witness to countless cars hauling ass or going the wrong way on Person St. towards Krispy Kreme...it's time to make it two lane. I'd love the morning traffic passing by to see we are open for b'fast. I participated in the presentation of road diet at the PSP meeting last month and the two-way/bike/parking choice just fits more in line with our growing and vibrant community of N Person St.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Andy O. LawrenceMany cars and dogs (including mine) have been smashed by speeding one-way traffic on Peace. The two-way scheme will absolutely have a calming impact and make the pedestrian oriented neighborhood a safer and more wonderful place to live and visit.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Daniel WhittakerBusiness owner located on person st. We are open very early and i would like to be visible to the incoming work traffic. Additional parking is always a perk. I'm also an avid bike rider and boarder and person st simply isn't safe enough to just ride on the side of a lane. Considering I watch cars go the wrong way up person st almost every day, I think making it official makes it even more safe. Pedestrians have been trained to only look down towards Krispy Kreme because a car shouldn't be coming the other way. But they do.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Graham StoneMy two observations are that the traffic speeds on Person Street are often far too high, and that the Krispy Kreme parking lot doubles as a bypass for traffic leaving the Oakwood neighborhood on Boundary St heading to Peace St. The high speed of traffic coming from downtown leaves me wary of riding my bike anywhere but on the sidewalk, and as more restaurants/shops/bars move in, there is bound to be an accident if the "get out of downtown fast" thoroughfare remains.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Barbara DollPerson and Blount St. represent a major North/South corridor for Raleigh. Not everyone who works in downtown at the state government buildings and private offices lives in downtown. People must be able to move in and out of downtown for work. I am a downtown resident and I prefer to bike and walk whenever possible. But, I also have many times that I want to get into or out of downtown as efficiently as possible. So, the one-way traffic with pre-timed lights makes this possible. It would be selfish to base this plan only on the desires of the downtown residents. Have you polled the people that are commuting to and from downtown every day? If the lights are pre-timed such that drivers maintain a low (30 mph) but consistent speed, it will allow for efficient ingress and egress.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Brian RalphI applaud your efforts on this. As President of William Peace University, I can assure you we deeply desire the development of the area and the opportunity for our neighbors, faculty, staff and students to enjoy a wonderful quality of life and these changes would enhance the area substantially. Furthermore, it will create a safer experience for all.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
NeighborThe pavement along this project has needed improvement for years.
'Bout Time !
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Jay DawkinsHey folks, sorry for the issue with the voting this afternoon - this is now fixed and we're emailing those who had issues. -Jay at Cityzen
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Jay Anderson BreenBike Share Raleigh hasn't even begun. Article of interest http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/05/07/476651753/your-workout-data-might-be-helping-cities-build-safer-streets
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkThanks for the link!! We'll take a look.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Tom MoranOne-way streets are a failed strategy from a car-centric world. Let's return most of Raleigh's streets to 2-way.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Asif SamadIf it reduces the speed of cars on the street it will be greatly beneficial to local residents. I would not want the on-street parking availability to be reduced at all. A bike lane would increase safety for cyclists and promote this healthier means of transport
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Ted KunstlingWhile downtown residents may like to keep automobile traffic down, the vast majority patrons of the NC Symphony, Opera, ballet, galleries, museums, restaurants, and other downtown attractions rely on their autos for access. Unwise implementation of road diets and bike lanes worsen congestion and threaten the viability of these institutions which attract people downtown in the first place. Bike lanes and road diets seem to be a fad that is being foisted on the city in a pell-mell manner without sufficient homework and proper design.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Alex GordezIt's much safer to have one way streets. Learn from NewYork..
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Roger HendersonThe other alternative is projected to operate at LOS A/B. I believe that is unacceptable in an urban area, especially in residential and business districts. I favor on-street parking and I prefer a bike lane over sharrows. Two way operation is much healthier than one-way because way too many people get lost in one-way networks.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
russ mcclureI feel the two Streets Blount and Person are proper as one way and the most cost effective upgrades would be to add bike lane and upgrade and improve sidewalks in disrepair and non existing. Parking along these roads can be utilized by residents only that do not have driveways otherwise parking should be for side streets only. I am a current resident along S. Blount and E. Lee Streets
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Jason JonesThis is a growing city who is no where near ready to reduce the amount of automobiles on the roadways with the available public transit system. Reducing the lanes for the volume of traffic seems like a bad idea until we have more robust transit system and can support more walk ability. This is not just a downtown road, but a major north/south route
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Stef MendellI don't think we need dedicated bike lanes. Sharrows are sufficient. I think more on-street parking is needed. The businesses are drawing more cars and they are impinging on residential parking. I don't have a preference for one-way versus two-way.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Stef MendellI don't care if it's one-way or two-way, but I don't think we need dedicated bike lanes -- just sharrows. And I think more on-street parking is important.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Carol SoroosI am writing as an advocate for pedestrian safety. I hope that the plan will include enhancements to protect people walking in the area -- e.g., sidewalks on both sides, crosswalks, "walk" signals at intersections with traffic lights, ”islands" at any such intersections where there are two or more lanes for traffic in each directionand signs indicating that drivers should yield to pedestrians, where appropriate.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkCarol - Thanks for your comments. Phase I will include improved high visibility crosswalks, but the median islands and additional sidewalks on Wake Forest are not included in this phase. They are proposed as part of the Phase II streetscape phase.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Anita WatkinsSupport two-way plus bike and parking to offer the maximum transportation options and to calm traffic. Look forward to the improvements! Thank you.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Lisa FinaldiWe need to improve walkability in our business district and promote alternatives to cars since our parking is very limited and is beginning to spill into adjacent neighborhoods. Person Street is a bit of a race track and can be pretty scary at certain times of day. Our business district is changing rapidly for the better and so must transport through it!
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Christine Freiman2-way lanes will calm traffic which improves safety for all. Bike lanes are also needed for safety, and parking is a must for our wonderful cafes and shops to thrive.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Christine FreimanTwo way will calm traffic; bike lanes are badly needed for safety of bikers, and parking is a must for shops and cafes.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Mary SellTraffic needs to be slowed down substantially on these cut through streets. Our family bikes and walks this corridor daily, and anything we can do to slow down traffic, and make the road more accessible to alternate transportation modes, would be very much appreciated! Cars fly through this area - it's really not safe given the close proximity to business and residential.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Aranazazu LascurainPlease convert more streets to 2 way. The city needs more options on east-west axis. This will also reduce miles travelled. It's time!
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Philip BernardTwo way operation in the Person Street business district is best and will improve access to businesses and make it more pedestrian friendly. It will also help calm traffic and create more of a downtown neighborhood feel rather than the three lane raceway it is now. Also, since Wake Forest Road is going down to two lanes in either direction, it makes sense that North Person Street should do the same. Interested to see where parking spaces will be located on the west side of the street between curb cuts.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkThanks for the note...we are working with Cityzen and our Communications staff to get to problem resolved ASAP!!!
- Todd Delk, City of Raleigh Office of Transportation Planning
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Allie JacobsThis form is not letting me select an option. My vote is for an option that includes dedicated bike lanes. I do not drive this corridor enough to know which traffic option (one or two way) is best.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
How would you characterize your interest in the Wake Forest/Blount/Person project (select all that apply)?
Mordecai/Oakwood resident
61%
Raleigh resident
42%
Cycling enthusiast / commuter
36%
Person St. Business District owner / regular customer
36%
Downtown (other than Mordecai/Oakwood) resident / worker
25%
Area commuter / traveling public
20%
Peace or Shaw University student / faculty / staff
3%
Other (Explain in Comments)
3%
Poll Closed | 160 Responses
Pierre TongBike lanes would be great - I live in the Five Points area and adding bike lanes on Wake Forest Road would provide an additional safe way for me to get downtown without going on Glenwood Ave or St. Mary's St
Reply Flag 4 Agreeone year ago
tom edwardsI'm thinking the two-way proposal would really change things in a nice way. As it is now, people really barrel down person Street it seems sort of dangerous. Also I think it would do a lot for business owners, restaurant people and basically all around shopping... Just making everything a lot more inviting and vibrant down here
Reply Flag 3 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydAgree that the resurfacing is needed, but the bike lanes should be reconsidered.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Jim McMahanI actually like Person St the way it is (one way), but what I notice could be improved is providing more parking for customers in the business area of N. Person. I see that as the major constraint to people stopping, spending more time, and patronizing the businesses in the area.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Jackie TwisdaleIt's time to slow the traffic down on Person. Person St. goes through several residential neighborhoods and the current configuration is not sensitive to the safety of those that live and invest in those neighborhoods.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
russ mcclureI live along the Person Blount Street Corridor
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Stef MendellPerson Street resident
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Carol SoroosI live in Raleigh, but am writing as an advocate for pedestrian safety. I hope that the plan will include enhancements to protect people walking in the area -- e.g., sidewalks on both sides, crosswalks, "walk" signals at intersections with traffic lights, "islands" at any such intersections where there are two or more lanes for traffic in each direction, and signs indicating that drivers should yield to pedestrians, where appropriate.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Mary SellWe live in Mordecai and bike/walk this corridor daily. It's not safe as is, and needs to account for multiple modes, and road users. We'd love to see a dedicated bike lane installed with enhanced pedestrian amenities. We use the new bike lanes downtown daily (thank you!) and very much appreciate the city considering all modes when installing transportation infrastructure.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
tom edwardsSlower traffic will definitely add to the night life down here.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Sean FarresNeighborhood markers and way-finding signage
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
David OakesPeople who like to walk or cycle can do so without changing the configuration as is. Just because someone is an enthusiast of walking or cycling you should not try to impose your ideas on everyone else.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Jay Anderson BreenBike Share Raleigh hasn't even begun. Article of interest? Technology Taking A Crack At Data Collection

Strava developed software and an app that allows cyclers and runners to track their journey and compare their achievements with others. It left the company with a huge database of how people move — and it decided to launch Strava Metro, a service that shows movement street by street. Data from users is anonymized and aggregated.

Link to Article: http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/05/07/476651753/your-workout-data-might-be-helping-cities-build-safer-streets
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
What aspect is most important to you personally in the Person Street Business District for the project?
Business/residential access
32%
Mobility / traffic flow
23%
Bicycle lane
21%
Intersection safety
14%
On-street parking
9%
Other (Explain in Comments)
2%
Poll Closed | 242 Responses
Matthew BookerReally important to reduce the danger and speed of traffic in this area. This street was not always a freeway, and it need not be a freeway in the future.
Reply Flag 7 Agreeone year ago
Ashley MorrisOur family lives right near this section of Person St and we are most concerned about keeping the traffic speed in check and walkability to our now thriving Person St business district. Safety of all modes of transportation whether walking, bike riding, or motoring should be a top priority of this area. We are a neighborhood and community as well as an important connector to other areas of the downtown area.
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Marlette WillettPerson Street provides a direct route out of our neighborhood and has been used as a main road to exit out of Raleigh for many years by commuters or visitors. The flow of the traffic in the city must be considered and also the flow out of our growing neighborhood and our bordering neighborhoods. Two way traffic I feel would slow those exiting from downtown.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Roger HendersonSafe operations require slow motor vehicle speeds, adequately wide facilities for cyclists and pedestrians and well-designed intersections. Providing on-street parking contributes to slower vehicle speeds and it also adds a useful buffer between pedestrians and moving vehicles.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Linda EdmistenThe creation of an urban, safe, pedestrian atmosphere that can occur only with two-lane traffic
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Andy O. LawrenceAs well as making Person street a safer place to be with easier access.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydTraffic flow and parking continue to be priorities for me.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
City of Raleigh Poll:
What aspect is most important to you personally in the Wake Forest/Blount/Person corridors for the project?
Mobility / traffic flow
26%
Business/residential access
26%
Bicycle lane
22%
Intersection safety
19%
On-street parking
4%
Other (Explain in Comments)
3%
Poll Closed | 235 Responses
Alex SlaterMaking the corridors more pedestrian / cyclist friendly!
Reply Flag 7 Agreeone year ago
Pierre TongI disagree - as a biker, bike lanes help carve out space on the street for cyclists. Riding on the sidewalk is very dangerous especially on the downtown areas due to heavy pedestrian traffic (and in the past when businesses were able to have tables on the sidewalk) so that idea is completely impractical. The bike lanes are not confusing having driven and biked downtown......the green paint shows areas where there are potential conflicts between drivers making right turns and cyclists in the bike lane so that both parties can be aware of what could happen.
Reply Flag 3 Agreeone year ago
Allie JacobsBike lanes help protect cyclists, add space between cars and pedestrians, and reduce traffic to safer speeds.
Reply Flag 2 Agreeone year ago
Jennifer WagnerMaking the roads more pedestrian and cyclist friendly should be a priority.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Bart LeathermanBike lanes will continue to be unsafe unless there is a physical barrier between the auto lane and bike lane. The new bike lanes downtown are confusing and dangerous. I would hope the bike lanes would be better planned, not simply added for the sake of having them. Otherwise, I would suggest riding on the sidewalk. Although the road diet will calm the speed of traffic (a good thing), my only concern about the road diet is that the center turn lane will cause back up and idling, similar to Peace Street near Glenwood. Also, the information is not clear as to where bulb-outs would be placed in the future phase.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Jan LassiterI am most concerned about the loss of property that will result from the added sidewalk planned on Wake Forest Road. Property owners on that side of the street have very little frontage as it is and cannot afford any to be taken away. With that in mind, the city should just leave that side of Wake Forest Rd as is. Either that or put in the sidewalk but forget about the bike lanes.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkJan, thanks for the comment. Just FYI - Phase I is only focusing on changes between the curb, but we are definitely aware of the concerns. Minimizing impacts to properties will be a major piece of the design work for Phase II (not funded at this time).
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
sean dailAgreed.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydTraffic flow and parking continue to be priorities for me.
Reply Flag 1 Agreeone year ago
Linda EdmistenThe creation of two-lane, urban, safe, pedestrian corridors that will enhance the communities the corridors serve.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Christine FreimanIt's impossible to pick between safety, parking, and bike lanes. All are very important.
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago
Sean FarresSignage and wayfinding for the neighborhoods
Reply Flag 0 Agreeone year ago

Past Project Activity

Which alternative do you prefer? (Select one)
  • 191 56% Two-way operation, bike lane, and parking
  • 128 37% One-way operation with bike lanes and parking
  • 20 6% Two-way operation only
  • 5 1% Other (Explain in Comments)
Alex SlaterAs a resident who enjoys the walkability of this area, my priority would be keeping automobile traffic down. Converting Person to 2-way traffic would seem to invite more traffic from cars. Improving the sidewalks and bike lanes would seem to encourage more visits to the area by foot or by bike. We should be planning for Peace St also to be overhauled and made more accessible on foot.
Reply 8 Agreeone year ago
Matthew BookerTwo way, with a bike lane, solves so many problems. Much better for residents, and for traffic calming, and for pedestrians and bicyclists. Be bold, City of Raleigh!
Reply 8 Agreeone year ago
Philip BernardTwo way operation with bike lane and parking is best because it will improve access to businesses and pedestrian safety. It will help calm traffic and give the business district more of a downtown neighborhood feel rather than a 2 lane race track. Wake Forest Road is going down to two lanes in each direction so it makes sense to make North Person Street two way as well. I'm interested in where parking spaces will go between curb cut on the west side of the street.
Reply 7 Agreeone year ago
Pierre TongAccording to the report from the consultant, two-way traffic would increase travel times through the corridor more than the one-way road diet. (55/98 sec AM/PM for 2-way and 47/40 sec - AM/PM for 1-way). Also there would be parking lost with the two-way conversion to accommodate left turn lanes and the 2-way traffic. There are no significant drawbacks noted in the report for the 1-way road diet.
Reply 6 Agreeone year ago
Brett MajorThere are many drawbacks to one-way roads. Traffic accidents are twice as likely on one-way roads than two-way roads. One-way roads are confusing to drivers - I hear honking several times a day because drivers are going the wrong way down Person Street.

Also, after converting one-way roads to two-way roads, research shows that property values and business revenue increase, so does pedestrian traffic.

Here are some articles about this issue:
http://www.citylab.com/commute/2013/01/case-against-one-way-streets/4549/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/04/17/why-one-way-streets-really-are-the-worst/
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Aranazazu LascurainFolks, the whole reason for one ways, historically, was to move traffic quickly OUT of downtown. Downtown has changed. We are now a vibrant community. where roads now need to be shared with bikes and pedestrians. One way streets are definitely built for speed.
Reply 6 Agreeone year ago
tom edwardsIt seems like the traffic coming down person Street comes very quickly. I think the to a proposal would not only slow things down, but help the businesses and add to the vibrancy this downtown area.
Reply 5 Agreeone year ago
Matthew BookerTwo-way with bike lane solves so many problems for residents, pedestrians and bicyclists. Be bold, City of Raleigh!
Reply 5 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydI think the bike lanes should be reconsidered. Since they have been added to streets in the downtown area, they're rarely used by cyclists and automobile congestion has increased.
Reply 5 Agreeone year ago
Bradford WestI believe two-way with added parking could potentially slow traffic down to safer speeds.

Historically, multi-lane one-way streets were used to rapidly move cars out of urban core areas with little regard to surrounding neighborhoods and pedestrian safety. Our priorities have changed and a two-way option better serves our desired goals.
Reply 3 Agreeone year ago
Pierre TongThe one-way operation is working just fine - let's keep it that way and add bike lanes!
Reply 3 Agreeone year ago
Kris Morley-NikfarThis is an urban environment. All modes should be prioritized equally rather than catering to vehicle level of service. Converting this to two-way traffic will slow vehicle movements and create a more comfortable and safe environment for pedestrians (some who happen to also be transit riders) and bicyclists.
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Andy O. LawrenceThe one way traffic creates a faster and more dangerous road in a very pedestrian oriented neighborhood. several cars parked along Person Street have been crashed into and mirrors knocked off primarily due to the speed. Two way traffic and bike lanes have a calming affect because it slows things down and provides easier navigation for people who are new to the area. i realize that one-way flow of traffic is an engineering solution but there are social and economic factors that greatly outweigh that one consideration. I love the area and think this would have a very positive impact.
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Barbara DollPerson and Blount St. provide an extremely important and major north-south travel corridor through downtown. Even though I am an Oakwood Resident, I don't believe this decision should be based on the personal preference of just the downtown residents and business owners. Thousands of commuters must drive to and from downtown daily to do work or business at the state government buildings and private offices in downtown. Providing efficient ingress and egress to downtown is important to maintaining this important element of downtown. If everyone is sitting at traffic lights stuck in traffic, it will NOT encourage any one to live, work, shop or do anything in town. It just makes people frustrated and causes smog and waste time. So, please ensure that you collect the comments and input of the commuters. I prefer to walk and bike whenever possible, however, there are many times that I need to get in and out of town efficiently. I depend on the Blount, Wake Forest and Person St. routes for this. So, I do not want to take an extra 10 or even 20 minutes to get where I need to go. Lanes were eliminated from Peace St. a few years ago and all that has done is provide horrible traffic congestion, especially during rush hour. Again, being stuck in traffic does not encourage me or anyone else to shop or eat. It actually reduces their time that they have available to spend enjoying these activities. Certain routes through town must be maintained to provide this efficient movement through town. Other streets can provide more pedestrian opportunities. If you eliminate this traffic flow, somehow it will have to be recovered through another toute. Do we want a bypass interstate that runs over top of these streets? Remeber, that was the plan for Historic Oakwood back in the 70's and we know that did not work out. It is a bad idea. It is better to use our existing streets in an efficient manner.
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Brett MajorThe City of Raleigh had people do a report on how this would increase traffic times. That report shows that the traffic times on Person and Blount streets would only increase 40-47 seconds (for the one-way diet) and 55-98 seconds (for the two-way diet). I agree that we need to make traffic flow and efficiency a priority downtown. But safety, walkability, parking, property value, accessibility, are all important as well (and two-way roads are great for these issues).
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Barbara DollI wrote this message in a hurry. I apologize for the typos and poor sentence construction! Hopefully, my point is clear regardless.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Lisa FinaldiWe need to create a safer pedestrian business district. The race track feeling needs to be addressed. The district has really changed so needs the transport model. Also the bike lane can help bring more people to the district that are not in cars. Parking is limited and anything we can do to move people out of their cars is helpful!
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Bart LeathermanThe one-way street here is awesome. Changing it seems like a waste. Would prefer to focus on business and residential access with more parking, increased pedestrian safety, and traffic calming with the existing one way patterns.
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Arthurb3Keep the thorough fare streets oneway - Person, Blount, Morgan, and Edenton Streets. Bury utilities and fixing streets and sidewalks should be the priority.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Daniel WhittakerAs a business owner located on Person St., who lives on Glascock St, a rider of bikes/boards, driver of streets, and witness to countless cars hauling ass or going the wrong way on Person St. towards Krispy Kreme...it's time to make it two lane. I'd love the morning traffic passing by to see we are open for b'fast. I participated in the presentation of road diet at the PSP meeting last month and the two-way/bike/parking choice just fits more in line with our growing and vibrant community of N Person St.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Andy O. LawrenceMany cars and dogs (including mine) have been smashed by speeding one-way traffic on Peace. The two-way scheme will absolutely have a calming impact and make the pedestrian oriented neighborhood a safer and more wonderful place to live and visit.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Daniel WhittakerBusiness owner located on person st. We are open very early and i would like to be visible to the incoming work traffic. Additional parking is always a perk. I'm also an avid bike rider and boarder and person st simply isn't safe enough to just ride on the side of a lane. Considering I watch cars go the wrong way up person st almost every day, I think making it official makes it even more safe. Pedestrians have been trained to only look down towards Krispy Kreme because a car shouldn't be coming the other way. But they do.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Graham StoneMy two observations are that the traffic speeds on Person Street are often far too high, and that the Krispy Kreme parking lot doubles as a bypass for traffic leaving the Oakwood neighborhood on Boundary St heading to Peace St. The high speed of traffic coming from downtown leaves me wary of riding my bike anywhere but on the sidewalk, and as more restaurants/shops/bars move in, there is bound to be an accident if the "get out of downtown fast" thoroughfare remains.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Barbara DollPerson and Blount St. represent a major North/South corridor for Raleigh. Not everyone who works in downtown at the state government buildings and private offices lives in downtown. People must be able to move in and out of downtown for work. I am a downtown resident and I prefer to bike and walk whenever possible. But, I also have many times that I want to get into or out of downtown as efficiently as possible. So, the one-way traffic with pre-timed lights makes this possible. It would be selfish to base this plan only on the desires of the downtown residents. Have you polled the people that are commuting to and from downtown every day? If the lights are pre-timed such that drivers maintain a low (30 mph) but consistent speed, it will allow for efficient ingress and egress.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Brian RalphI applaud your efforts on this. As President of William Peace University, I can assure you we deeply desire the development of the area and the opportunity for our neighbors, faculty, staff and students to enjoy a wonderful quality of life and these changes would enhance the area substantially. Furthermore, it will create a safer experience for all.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
NeighborThe pavement along this project has needed improvement for years.
'Bout Time !
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Jay DawkinsHey folks, sorry for the issue with the voting this afternoon - this is now fixed and we're emailing those who had issues. -Jay at Cityzen
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Jay Anderson BreenBike Share Raleigh hasn't even begun. Article of interest http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/05/07/476651753/your-workout-data-might-be-helping-cities-build-safer-streets
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkThanks for the link!! We'll take a look.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Tom MoranOne-way streets are a failed strategy from a car-centric world. Let's return most of Raleigh's streets to 2-way.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Asif SamadIf it reduces the speed of cars on the street it will be greatly beneficial to local residents. I would not want the on-street parking availability to be reduced at all. A bike lane would increase safety for cyclists and promote this healthier means of transport
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Ted KunstlingWhile downtown residents may like to keep automobile traffic down, the vast majority patrons of the NC Symphony, Opera, ballet, galleries, museums, restaurants, and other downtown attractions rely on their autos for access. Unwise implementation of road diets and bike lanes worsen congestion and threaten the viability of these institutions which attract people downtown in the first place. Bike lanes and road diets seem to be a fad that is being foisted on the city in a pell-mell manner without sufficient homework and proper design.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Alex GordezIt's much safer to have one way streets. Learn from NewYork..
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Roger HendersonThe other alternative is projected to operate at LOS A/B. I believe that is unacceptable in an urban area, especially in residential and business districts. I favor on-street parking and I prefer a bike lane over sharrows. Two way operation is much healthier than one-way because way too many people get lost in one-way networks.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
russ mcclureI feel the two Streets Blount and Person are proper as one way and the most cost effective upgrades would be to add bike lane and upgrade and improve sidewalks in disrepair and non existing. Parking along these roads can be utilized by residents only that do not have driveways otherwise parking should be for side streets only. I am a current resident along S. Blount and E. Lee Streets
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Jason JonesThis is a growing city who is no where near ready to reduce the amount of automobiles on the roadways with the available public transit system. Reducing the lanes for the volume of traffic seems like a bad idea until we have more robust transit system and can support more walk ability. This is not just a downtown road, but a major north/south route
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Stef MendellI don't think we need dedicated bike lanes. Sharrows are sufficient. I think more on-street parking is needed. The businesses are drawing more cars and they are impinging on residential parking. I don't have a preference for one-way versus two-way.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Stef MendellI don't care if it's one-way or two-way, but I don't think we need dedicated bike lanes -- just sharrows. And I think more on-street parking is important.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Carol SoroosI am writing as an advocate for pedestrian safety. I hope that the plan will include enhancements to protect people walking in the area -- e.g., sidewalks on both sides, crosswalks, "walk" signals at intersections with traffic lights, ”islands" at any such intersections where there are two or more lanes for traffic in each directionand signs indicating that drivers should yield to pedestrians, where appropriate.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkCarol - Thanks for your comments. Phase I will include improved high visibility crosswalks, but the median islands and additional sidewalks on Wake Forest are not included in this phase. They are proposed as part of the Phase II streetscape phase.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Anita WatkinsSupport two-way plus bike and parking to offer the maximum transportation options and to calm traffic. Look forward to the improvements! Thank you.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Lisa FinaldiWe need to improve walkability in our business district and promote alternatives to cars since our parking is very limited and is beginning to spill into adjacent neighborhoods. Person Street is a bit of a race track and can be pretty scary at certain times of day. Our business district is changing rapidly for the better and so must transport through it!
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Christine Freiman2-way lanes will calm traffic which improves safety for all. Bike lanes are also needed for safety, and parking is a must for our wonderful cafes and shops to thrive.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Christine FreimanTwo way will calm traffic; bike lanes are badly needed for safety of bikers, and parking is a must for shops and cafes.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Mary SellTraffic needs to be slowed down substantially on these cut through streets. Our family bikes and walks this corridor daily, and anything we can do to slow down traffic, and make the road more accessible to alternate transportation modes, would be very much appreciated! Cars fly through this area - it's really not safe given the close proximity to business and residential.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Aranazazu LascurainPlease convert more streets to 2 way. The city needs more options on east-west axis. This will also reduce miles travelled. It's time!
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Philip BernardTwo way operation in the Person Street business district is best and will improve access to businesses and make it more pedestrian friendly. It will also help calm traffic and create more of a downtown neighborhood feel rather than the three lane raceway it is now. Also, since Wake Forest Road is going down to two lanes in either direction, it makes sense that North Person Street should do the same. Interested to see where parking spaces will be located on the west side of the street between curb cuts.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkThanks for the note...we are working with Cityzen and our Communications staff to get to problem resolved ASAP!!!
- Todd Delk, City of Raleigh Office of Transportation Planning
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Allie JacobsThis form is not letting me select an option. My vote is for an option that includes dedicated bike lanes. I do not drive this corridor enough to know which traffic option (one or two way) is best.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
How would you characterize your interest in the Wake Forest/Blount/Person project (select all that apply)?
  • 98 61% Mordecai/Oakwood resident
  • 67 42% Raleigh resident
  • 57 36% Person St. Business District owner / regular customer
  • 57 36% Cycling enthusiast / commuter
  • 40 25% Downtown (other than Mordecai/Oakwood) resident / worker
  • 32 20% Area commuter / traveling public
  • 4 2% Other (Explain in Comments)
  • 4 2% Peace or Shaw University student / faculty / staff
Pierre TongBike lanes would be great - I live in the Five Points area and adding bike lanes on Wake Forest Road would provide an additional safe way for me to get downtown without going on Glenwood Ave or St. Mary's St
Reply 4 Agreeone year ago
tom edwardsI'm thinking the two-way proposal would really change things in a nice way. As it is now, people really barrel down person Street it seems sort of dangerous. Also I think it would do a lot for business owners, restaurant people and basically all around shopping... Just making everything a lot more inviting and vibrant down here
Reply 3 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydAgree that the resurfacing is needed, but the bike lanes should be reconsidered.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Jim McMahanI actually like Person St the way it is (one way), but what I notice could be improved is providing more parking for customers in the business area of N. Person. I see that as the major constraint to people stopping, spending more time, and patronizing the businesses in the area.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Jackie TwisdaleIt's time to slow the traffic down on Person. Person St. goes through several residential neighborhoods and the current configuration is not sensitive to the safety of those that live and invest in those neighborhoods.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
russ mcclureI live along the Person Blount Street Corridor
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Stef MendellPerson Street resident
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Carol SoroosI live in Raleigh, but am writing as an advocate for pedestrian safety. I hope that the plan will include enhancements to protect people walking in the area -- e.g., sidewalks on both sides, crosswalks, "walk" signals at intersections with traffic lights, "islands" at any such intersections where there are two or more lanes for traffic in each direction, and signs indicating that drivers should yield to pedestrians, where appropriate.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Mary SellWe live in Mordecai and bike/walk this corridor daily. It's not safe as is, and needs to account for multiple modes, and road users. We'd love to see a dedicated bike lane installed with enhanced pedestrian amenities. We use the new bike lanes downtown daily (thank you!) and very much appreciate the city considering all modes when installing transportation infrastructure.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
tom edwardsSlower traffic will definitely add to the night life down here.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Sean FarresNeighborhood markers and way-finding signage
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
David OakesPeople who like to walk or cycle can do so without changing the configuration as is. Just because someone is an enthusiast of walking or cycling you should not try to impose your ideas on everyone else.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Jay Anderson BreenBike Share Raleigh hasn't even begun. Article of interest? Technology Taking A Crack At Data Collection

Strava developed software and an app that allows cyclers and runners to track their journey and compare their achievements with others. It left the company with a huge database of how people move — and it decided to launch Strava Metro, a service that shows movement street by street. Data from users is anonymized and aggregated.

Link to Article: http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/05/07/476651753/your-workout-data-might-be-helping-cities-build-safer-streets
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
What aspect is most important to you personally in the Wake Forest/Blount/Person corridors for the project?
  • 61 26% Mobility / traffic flow
  • 61 26% Business/residential access
  • 52 22% Bicycle lane
  • 44 19% Intersection safety
  • 9 4% On-street parking
  • 8 3% Other (Explain in Comments)
Alex SlaterMaking the corridors more pedestrian / cyclist friendly!
Reply 7 Agreeone year ago
Pierre TongI disagree - as a biker, bike lanes help carve out space on the street for cyclists. Riding on the sidewalk is very dangerous especially on the downtown areas due to heavy pedestrian traffic (and in the past when businesses were able to have tables on the sidewalk) so that idea is completely impractical. The bike lanes are not confusing having driven and biked downtown......the green paint shows areas where there are potential conflicts between drivers making right turns and cyclists in the bike lane so that both parties can be aware of what could happen.
Reply 3 Agreeone year ago
Allie JacobsBike lanes help protect cyclists, add space between cars and pedestrians, and reduce traffic to safer speeds.
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Jennifer WagnerMaking the roads more pedestrian and cyclist friendly should be a priority.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Bart LeathermanBike lanes will continue to be unsafe unless there is a physical barrier between the auto lane and bike lane. The new bike lanes downtown are confusing and dangerous. I would hope the bike lanes would be better planned, not simply added for the sake of having them. Otherwise, I would suggest riding on the sidewalk. Although the road diet will calm the speed of traffic (a good thing), my only concern about the road diet is that the center turn lane will cause back up and idling, similar to Peace Street near Glenwood. Also, the information is not clear as to where bulb-outs would be placed in the future phase.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Jan LassiterI am most concerned about the loss of property that will result from the added sidewalk planned on Wake Forest Road. Property owners on that side of the street have very little frontage as it is and cannot afford any to be taken away. With that in mind, the city should just leave that side of Wake Forest Rd as is. Either that or put in the sidewalk but forget about the bike lanes.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Todd DelkJan, thanks for the comment. Just FYI - Phase I is only focusing on changes between the curb, but we are definitely aware of the concerns. Minimizing impacts to properties will be a major piece of the design work for Phase II (not funded at this time).
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
sean dailAgreed.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydTraffic flow and parking continue to be priorities for me.
Reply 1 Agreeone year ago
Linda EdmistenThe creation of two-lane, urban, safe, pedestrian corridors that will enhance the communities the corridors serve.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Christine FreimanIt's impossible to pick between safety, parking, and bike lanes. All are very important.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Sean FarresSignage and wayfinding for the neighborhoods
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
What aspect is most important to you personally in the Person Street Business District for the project?
  • 77 32% Business/residential access
  • 55 23% Mobility / traffic flow
  • 50 21% Bicycle lane
  • 33 14% Intersection safety
  • 22 9% On-street parking
  • 5 2% Other (Explain in Comments)
Matthew BookerReally important to reduce the danger and speed of traffic in this area. This street was not always a freeway, and it need not be a freeway in the future.
Reply 7 Agreeone year ago
Ashley MorrisOur family lives right near this section of Person St and we are most concerned about keeping the traffic speed in check and walkability to our now thriving Person St business district. Safety of all modes of transportation whether walking, bike riding, or motoring should be a top priority of this area. We are a neighborhood and community as well as an important connector to other areas of the downtown area.
Reply 2 Agreeone year ago
Marlette WillettPerson Street provides a direct route out of our neighborhood and has been used as a main road to exit out of Raleigh for many years by commuters or visitors. The flow of the traffic in the city must be considered and also the flow out of our growing neighborhood and our bordering neighborhoods. Two way traffic I feel would slow those exiting from downtown.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Roger HendersonSafe operations require slow motor vehicle speeds, adequately wide facilities for cyclists and pedestrians and well-designed intersections. Providing on-street parking contributes to slower vehicle speeds and it also adds a useful buffer between pedestrians and moving vehicles.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Linda EdmistenThe creation of an urban, safe, pedestrian atmosphere that can occur only with two-lane traffic
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Andy O. LawrenceAs well as making Person street a safer place to be with easier access.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago
Ethan FloydTraffic flow and parking continue to be priorities for me.
Reply 0 Agreeone year ago