BikeRaleigh Plan Update – Survey II

Thank you for your interest in the BikeRaleigh Plan Update!  Please take a few moments to fill out this short questionnaire. Your response will help build a better understanding of community needs and priorities. Even if you do not bike regularly, your feedback will be helpful. Thank you for your time!

Go to BikeRaleigh.org/BikePlan for more information and to provide geographic input on a wikimap.

City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Bike Lane)
Yes
83%
No
17%
Closed to responses | 109 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Buffered Bike Lane)
Yes
96%
No
4%
Closed to responses | 109 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Greenway)
Yes
96%
No
4%
Closed to responses | 108 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Paved Shoulder)
No
63%
Yes
37%
Closed to responses | 105 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Neighborhood Road)
Yes
82%
No
18%
Closed to responses | 103 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Protected Cycle Track)
Yes
99%
No
1%
Closed to responses | 102 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Sharrow)
No
64%
Yes
36%
Closed to responses | 88 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Wide Outside Lane)
No
61%
Yes
39%
Closed to responses | 99 Responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
My favorite place to bike in Raleigh is...?
Closed to responses
City of Raleigh Poll:
The most difficult place to bike in Raleigh is...?
Closed to responses

Past Project Activity

My favorite place to bike in Raleigh is...?
J ERight now the only place I look forward to biking is the greenway. Much applause to the city for having the vision and commitment to build this gem. But it's not functional as a commuting route, so I continue to be afraid on the road.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
aprylmajor@hotmail.comI haven't found one yet...biking is limited to a few select places in the Raleigh area and I don't feel comfortable riding my bike with all the congestion.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mollymstuartI haven't found one yet, but I'm sure it'll be the first cycle track.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackSpring Hill. Would love to see the city dedicate a portion of Dix Hill to cycle sports. Vibrant bike culture is good for everyone and improves the livability of modern cities. If Raleigh wants to be a destination city or attractive to new investment, then it needs to invest in bikes.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
CbrockettGreenways, centennial campus, dix, umstead, downtown
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sspagsTo and from Hillsborough Street coffee shops.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
TravGreenways are the best!
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Geoffrey SmithThe greenways and downtown.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
StevenTo the Art museum and Downtown.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Steve SoriceGreenways
ReplyAgree3 years ago
billkcummingsGreenways
ReplyAgree3 years ago
douggambleOur incredible greenway
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellygreenways, but I wish there were more road bike lanes
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Alex HowardGreenways.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Ben Lisfalls of neuse trail
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageAbsolutely the greenways.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
cox8321greenways
ReplyAgree3 years ago
David AnsbacherGreenways
ReplyAgree3 years ago
katevvDorthea Dix & surrounding greenways!
ReplyAgree3 years ago
joe ttfalls of the neuse
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Karen LuseGreenways, downtown, Umstead.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Emerson Murphy-Hillneuse river trail
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Elizabeth KeyserHistoric neighborhoods, especially Oakwood, Mordecai, and the ones between NC State and Cameron Village.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Ben McKeownAnywhere with a bike lane or greenway.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mnementh61neuse river, Crabtree creek and high house greenways
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Leo SuarezWalnut Creek Greenway
ReplyAgree3 years ago
fyouThe greenway through NC State campus to the Arboretum
ReplyAgree3 years ago
The most difficult place to bike in Raleigh is...?
J EWake Forest Road. Thin lanes, awful potholes, people speeding.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
aprylmajor@hotmail.comTo church. I attend Hope Community Church on Buck Jones Road and the road is terrible for walking, biking, or catching a bus. There have been a number of pedestrian accidents along this one mile stretch of road and Raleigh seems to have forgotten it's responsibilities on this street.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Lois Cavanagh-DaleyCapital Boulevard
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mollymstuartThe Atlantic/Six Forks route. I see cyclists there all the time and feel terrified for them.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
nmauchI'd to have more thoroughfares with bike lines (i.e., Millbrook or Creedmore), or clearly marked alternative neighborhood routes that don't have stop signs too often. Also, a safer route to get from near Millbrook and Glenwood to Edwards Mill, and also down Blue Ridge towards the art museum. Duraleigh is dangerous an the sidewalks are dangerous in some spots, particularly crossing over Crabtree Creek.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Clarissa LivingstonSix Forks Road south of North Hills. My particular commute is turned into a 45 minute workout because this section of Six Forks has no continuous sidewalk or wide shoulder or bike lane, forcing me to detour into neighborhood roads that are full of cul-de-sacs, indirect routes, and very steep hills.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
awillisivThe northern part of where Person Street turns into Wake Forest, up through Atlantic to where Crabtree Creek Greenway intersects with Atlantic. If we could get bike lanes in this area it would allow north downtown/Mordecai/Oakdale to connect to 5 points and all of the new activity in the Whitaker Mill and Atlantic area, as well as get access to the greenway there on Atlantic. There is currently no good way to connect 5 points and downtown - to connect down the Atlantic/Wake Forest/Person-Blount corridor would be awesome.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackWay too many places. Unfortunately many of the most dangerous places are where there is the most need, particularly for the citizenry that relies on bicycles as a primary mode of transportation. People don't bike on Capital Blvd because they want to.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerNorth Hills near the mall. Going down the hill from the mall is a nail-biter. In the morning it seems like everyone in a motor vehicle is late for something. Few people know was a "sharrow" means. "Sharrows" and yield signs are not enforced. Lassiter Mill sharrows and ped yield signs are routinely ignored when I'm using them. Not convinced RPD considers bikes and peds as commuters that need to be protected.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
CbrockettThe stretch of Avent Ferry Road between Western Blvd and Gorman. Lots of students/pedestrians, cars, and buses, but no bike facilities on road. Same is true of Western Blvd from Avent Ferry intersection all the way out past 440. These are prime routes for commuters and not really bike friendly. Tryon Road is in the same category.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeremy DeGrootAny of the major North-South routes like Glenwood, Six Forks, or Capital are basically unbikeable due to traffic and narrow lanes.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
TravTurning onto Six Forks Road from any of the neighborhood streets (example: Six Forks road and Coleridge Drive).
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Geoffrey SmithAnywhere near Six Forks Rd or Wake Forest Rd.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
StevenI'm a student that commutes from Apex to Raleigh by bike during the school year. On the whole, it is pretty easy getting around Raleigh by bike compared to the challenge of biking through Cary. If I had to pick one place that seems like it should be easier then I would pick Peace St. I typically use a different route to head out towards Person St but even the little segment of Peace that I do ride is pretty terrifying. I guess because of the 50/401 entrance and the big hill cars tend to carry a lot of speed coming through there. It's a shame, too, because there are a lot of cool shops in that area.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
billkcummingsSE Raleigh greenways need to be improved. So much work has been done on the greenways in the suburbs (landscaping, signage, etc) at the same time the older sections of the greenways in SE Raleigh are neglected.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
douggambleGetting through around or under major junctions: 440 & Old Wake Forest Rd, 440 and Capital Blvd, 440 and Six forks
too scary to bike around that area
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff ConnellyEast of Capital Blvd is not good, not familiar with other areas
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Alex HowardThe Atlantic/Capital corridor, Six Forks, Falls of the Neuse, Glenwood -- pretty much all of North Raleigh around the beltline. Getting to downtown or even to the greenway is terrifying.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michele McIntoshNE Raleigh. No way into town, no way across capital boulevard to get anywhere west. No way to get to the Neuse River Greenway Trailhead at Buffaloe Road Athletic Park on the east side of our neighborhood without driving there. No way to go north to Wake Tech at 540. Those of us with cars are forced to drive, while our non-car owning neighbors bike or walk and people honk at them as they try to get to the grocery store, and then say they deserved it when they get hit by a car.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Holly Eden ZahnAtlantic (true stmt about Capital sacredsalvage!)
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageSix Forks, Atlantic, Glenwood, Falls of Neuse/Wake Forest Road - key north/south routes that marginally except bikes (no one lists Capital because it is too crazy to try)
ReplyAgree3 years ago
cox8321Atlantic Ave
ReplyAgree3 years ago
David AnsbacherSix forks south of Millbrook.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
katevvWake Forest Road, Glenwood Ave., through NCSU campus
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris ParninSix Forks, Glenwood, getting downtown.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
danimoore919Capital, Highwoods, Atlantic, Millbrook, Falls of Neuse
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Elizabeth KeyserThe eastern end of Lake Wheeler Rd., going towards downtown. Very tiny shoulder, with lots of cracks and pieces missing. It's very steep as well, which makes controlling your bike and seeing what's behind you very difficult, whether going up or down. It's a fairly high traffic area as well, especially around 8am and 5pm when a lot of working people are entering/leaving downtown. I have to use this road everyday to go to and from my house or to get anywhere downtown, so some kind of bike lane or at least widening of the road would make a huge difference in my daily commute.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Ben McKeownI work in Highwoods, live near downtown. Getting to Highwoods (Highwoods Blvd between Atlantic Ave and Captial Blvd) is almost impossible. This is too bad because I'd 100% bike to work if I could. Biking on Capital Blvd is just shy of suicide. The Atlantic Ave side (neighborhood streets/greenway trail is available) isn't bad until north of Crabtree Creek, when the sidewalk, shoulder, and greenway completely disappear.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mnementh61New Hope. I can use the Neuse greenway for where I usually go but, at 45mph during rush hour, I'm on the sidewalk.
Atlantic Ave. I jump on at Highwood and jump off at Crabtree creek, no side walk but a share the road sign :) .

ReplyAgree3 years ago
fyouBecause the bike trail through the NC Art Museum outdoor park is so steep I will sometimes go down Blue Ridge Parkway to get to the museum. I question my sanity every time I do it.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jason MyersIn my experience, getting from my neighborhood (East of 5 Points) to Downtown. The railroads and Capital Blvd take away the direct routes and make the remaining ones more challenging.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jay DawkinsSpeaking from general experience, my scariest biking adventures have been on the western edges of town outside the beltline. I used to work along Jones Franklin, and crossing the beltline on that skinny bridge felt daring at times. Western wasn't so bad (good sidewalks) but Hillsborough out near the fairground was also equally terrifying.

Wake Forest Road and Six Forks near the beltline are growing areas that it also feels a bit crazy to bike through. I appreciate the city's efforts to take a deliberate look at these spots, especially Six Forks as North Hills grows.

I think if one had to make sense of a pattern here, I see the city's long-running high-traffic corridors as the difficult places. Bikes naturally want to go here because they connect key destinations, but their development prior to the recognition of 'carless humans' as legitimate roadway users makes retrofitting difficult.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Bike Lane)
  • 90 83% Yes
  • 19 17% No
J ENot safe enough for busier roads.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
MarshaGordonThe problem is that this is usually interrupted with parked cars, which makes it more dangerous . Definitely the least preferable of the 3 options, but not a deal breaker.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mollymstuartI'd be pretty nervous, but I'd do it.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Amanda McClainI've been bike commuting for years so a lane like this one is fine for me. However, if we are looking to increase the number of new riders on the road and decrease the use of cars for short trips, wider, buffered lanes would improve use.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Clarissa LivingstonThe bike lane is too slender - Raleigh drivers speed, don't use blinkers, and generally aren't very friendly to bicycles in my experience. It's better than nothing, for sure, but more separation would be appreciated.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbThis is better than nothing. But, it comes with all the problems mentioned below.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackWhile bike lanes seem to be a good solution on the surface, they have problems: they collect debris, are not continuous, cars often park in them and they push cyclists too far to right to be seen. Many times it is safer to take the motor vehicle lane.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerWhat about garbage cans, cars, debris in the lane? What about lanes that start nowhere and end nowhere?
ReplyAgree3 years ago
TravThis is good, however use caution because some homeowners or guest may want to park in front of their homes (in the bike lane).
ReplyAgree3 years ago
This can be okay, but it is important for AUTOMOBILE DRIVERS to be more cognizant of the bikers and pedestrians. It is not always as safe as this particular image implies. And I concur with the statement that this is not something that is safe for children who are not escorted by adults.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Hugh DawsonThis works best in my mind if there are concurrently visible signs along the bike lane route that indicate it is a bike route...
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellyacceptable for adults, better than nothing, would prefer better if possible
ReplyAgree3 years ago
brentonsonI agree this is totally inappropriate for kids.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Ben LisYes but i would not let my son
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageIt depends on the route. On a lower traffic residential street I definitely would, but not on a commercial street.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Karen LuseMany times, cars and trucks park or stop in the bike lanes and force riders to go into traffic.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
fyouI already bike to the store
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Buffered Bike Lane)
  • 105 96% Yes
  • 4 4% No
J EDrivers need to know that bikes are a viable form of commuting and other transportation. If bikes are relegated to greenways, they will continue to be viewed as recreational vehicles only and be rejected as an accepted vehicle of commuting.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
MarshaGordonMuch better than option 1.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Clarissa LivingstonThe buffer adds a very necessary feeling of security, especially considering how high the speed limits on Raleigh roads are (35mph+, often 45mph+) and everyone speeds. The buffer also signals drivers to give the bikes room, and to pay attention to what is on the other side of the stripped buffer before crossing it (like at intersections).
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbBuffered is better than a regular bike lane.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackBuffered bike lane is better than regular bike lane.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerBetter for high speed roads (45/55). This is how Perdido Beach Blvd is set up. Had to watch out for runners but that easy because the buffer allowed negotiation.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Currie MixonUnfortunately, I see people driving cars and on electronic devices every day. This buffer is critical right now (until smarter cars and/or drivers) to give a little more space for poor attention drivers.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
StevenIt's still surprising that no city in NC has a protected bike lane yet. It would be cool if Raleigh was the first!
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ooh, this looks good. I think the problem is more that there is too much emphasis on how nice these are, but if these nice segments are too few and far between, it's all moot. There have to be enough -- and again there has to be enough awareness on the part of CAR DRIVERS, because no matter who's at fault, the biker/ pedestrian is at a FAR greater risk of personal injury.

ANyway, I like this one in particular because the fewer lanes of car traffic make it appear to be slower. I don't know if that is necessarily the case, though. traveling with multiple lanes of car traffic, especially when the cars are going 40mph or faster, is nerve-wracking! (not to mention unsafe)
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellyexcellent
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Elizabeth KeyserI would use it, but think the buffer is overkill. I personally feel plenty safe in a regular bike lane. There's enough asphalt and paved space as it is already, let's leave some grass. ;)
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mnementh61If you could keep the parked cars out of them
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Greenway)
  • 104 96% Yes
  • 4 4% No
J EThis option implies bikes are for recreation and mixes fast-moving bike riders with walkers and runners. Not safe enough.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
MarshaGordonThis would be amazing in terms of safety and recreation, but not as viable (I suspect) in terms of getting where you need to go.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mollymstuartIf it went somewhere important, that's great, even though it's less convenient than an on-street cycle track taking me through other useful destinations.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Clarissa LivingstonI like the greenways especially because they tend to keep the grades low or moderate - which is very important for commuting, since it reduces the amount that you sweat while riding (most places of work don't have showers). My two suggestions would be:
A- continuity. The greenways need to connect to places of work better than they do now, without suddenly turning into dirt tracks, encountering steps, or dumping out on to roads lacking bike lanes or shared lanes.
B: more access points, to help make routes more direct.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbLove greenways as main thoroughfares, but they have to connect with good infrastructure to places people work, shop, etc.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackIt's great that the city is investing in greenways. However, they are only one portion of a holistic transportation plan
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerThis option is not the best for early morning or late at night. Greenways currently do not connect with commerce.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Currie MixonI love my commute, which is mostly on the greenway, if I can afford the extra 20 minutes or so. I really like having buffered bike lanes, too, for a quicker option some days.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
StevenThe main issue that I have with Greenways is they add a lot of distance to a commute as they don't always provide the most direct route.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Looks great, but the least realistic, for any great amount of commuters. I know we have greenways, but these are too few for the city as a whole to use for regular commuting (to work, store, etc.)
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellyexcellent
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageThis is my favorite way to ride. The others are possible, but the greenway system here is one of my favorite things in Raleigh.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mnementh61less stressful but rarely the short route.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Paved Shoulder)
  • 66 63% No
  • 39 37% Yes
Clarissa LivingstonIf the paved shoulder is wide enough, certainly I would use it. I originally come from New England, and it's much easier to bike up there because of all the paved shoulders (and lower speed limits).
Reply1 Agree3 years ago
J ENot safe enough.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
aprylmajor@hotmail.comRaleigh has very few of these paved shoulders...there aren't even seats for bus stops.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbI would ride on a shoulder like that, but I doubt I'd bring my kid along. Safely navigating roads with shoulders that come and go requires skill and experience. Big shoulders help though, especially on busy roads.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackSome shoulders are better than nothing. Perhaps getting rid of the outdated share the road slogan and replacing it with cyclists may use full lane would help.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerBetter than nothing.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Currie MixonI call this the debris lane. This is where nails and other sharp items end up.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeremy DeGrootSome shoulders are better than others for this. It needs to be sufficiently wide -- 2 foot shoulders are common, and do not cut it for this.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I mean, I MIIIIGHT, if I had to. But this does not encourage non-car commuting. Traveling with multiple lanes of car traffic, especially when the cars are going 40mph or faster, is nerve-wracking!
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Hugh DawsonShoulder space is only reasonable for bikes if it is 3 feet wide at a minimum. Inconsistent width causes problems with both driver and cyclist
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff ConnellyThey make it look nice here - in practice, they aren't all this nice and safe, and besides this looks like a high speed road - not too safe
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Alex HowardOn less frequently trafficked roads, yes. This is similar to what you have at the beach. While those roads are often state highways that can be very heavily trafficked, they're usually just two lanes which slows traffic down with normal congestion. I feel that if you have this much room, then you might as well just paint it as a bike lane.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michele McIntoshThis is similar to the shoulders I rode on in Missouri as a teenager and young adult in the 80's. It's better than what we currently have in Raleigh in many areas. But angry and aggressive drivers make this option unsafe.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageToo much debris, cars will not slow down, and shoulders change in width regularly in Raleigh
ReplyAgree3 years ago
katevvThis is only viable on roads that aren't typically busy, but can be very scary if its along a main thoroughfare (ie, avent ferry road, glenwood ave)
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Karen LuseThis is not my favorite since many times there is debris/parked cars and trucks/etc in the shoulder. Plus, cars can still be aggressive with riders here.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Elizabeth KeyserAs long as the shoulder is wide enough and well paved (no huge cracks, potholes, or chunks missing) I feel perfectly safe using them.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
mnementh61I take the lane and disregard the shoulder
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Neighborhood Road)
  • 84 82% Yes
  • 19 18% No
Adam GeringerBandwagon effect
Reply1 Agree3 years ago
J ECar drivers do not respect bikes sharing "heir" road. Too unsafe.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Clarissa LivingstonAs long as the speed limit is 25mph or less, and these roads connect to bike lanes or greenways.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbAs others say, without thoughtful connections between neighborhoods, it's difficult to link reasonable routes together. Also, the main roads into and out of a neighborhood can be quite dangerous, and would benefit from speed control methods.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackIt is difficult to get from one neighborhood to another. For example biking from Woodcrest to Five Point requires a circuitous unpleasant route even they the two neighborhoods are very close together
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerRaleigh is filled with disconnected neighborhoods. I'd like to see gravel paths that create bike/ped networks to stores and offices using small roads.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
This photo is also not representative of much of Raleigh, so it's hard to say. My daughter (and I) do ride to and from school, and I'm hoping to extend that to the library (save Athens Drive Library!) and pool. However neighborhood roads can be great! We love ours, though traffic does go fast through some of them!
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellymaybe
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageYes, though if used as a connector for the greenway please add signs. Getting lost is very discouraging.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jason LettieIt depends on the neighborhood road. If it has good visibility, with sidewalks and/or a center median (like the photo), then yes. If it's an older neighborhood with narrow, hilly, curvy streets where people drive too fast and no sidewalk buffer exists (e.g., like many around North Hills), then no.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Protected Cycle Track)
  • 101 99% Yes
  • 1 1% No
J EThis is the way to encourage biking as a significant way to reduce auto traffic. Treat it like a meaningful means of transportation and make it fair (safe) to share the routes.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Clarissa LivingstonThis trumps a Greenway because there are no pedestrians to avoid, and high speeds can be reached because of that.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbSign of a mature, well planned, and diverse transportation infrastructure. And one that recognizes bikes as transport and not just recreation.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackDo it. Time for Raleigh to invest in the future.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michael MuellerIf no sidewalk then this pits walker vs cyclist.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellygreat
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Alex HowardThis would be great for busy thoroughfares like Capital or Six Forks.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Michele McIntoshI would love to have separate bike lanes. The intersections would need to be clearly marked and easily navigated with mutual respect between cars and cyclists.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Sharrow)
  • 56 64% No
  • 32 36% Yes
Clarissa LivingstonI would use it if the speed limit was 25mph or less. Otherwise the cars go too fast to react well to what bikes sharing their lane are doing.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbI'd use it, but I'd probably take the whole lane to stay out of the door zone, and this would irritate people driving cars.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackThese are better than no sharrow, but some driver education enforcement needs to accompany.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeremy DeGrootThis works well on, say, North Hills Drive where the lanes are nice and wide and traffic is not heavy
ReplyAgree3 years ago
StevenI actually don't get why this is still considered a "bicycle facility."
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Hugh DawsonOnly if sharrows are used over entire route or street section and not just in select spots
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Jeff Connellybike sign basically meaningless in practice
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Alex HowardDrivers DO NOT share the road and there's zero enforcement.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageLanes are too wide and cars will expect to pass or weave around at full speed.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
cox8321I do use routes like this but prefer not to. Drivers do not share the road or now what the sign means
ReplyAgree3 years ago
danimoore919I don't think most people understand the sharrow symbol.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Karen LuseI'm not sure if all drivers understand the sharrow symbol.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
I would bike to work, the store, to school, or a greenway if this was my route to get there. (Wide Outside Lane)
  • 60 61% No
  • 39 39% Yes
Clarissa LivingstonThis doesn't explicitly tell cars to expect bikers. My experience is that drivers will speed on wide lanes, and not expect bikes to share it.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
ctbI would use it, and use the whole lane if necessary. But, I would be hesitant to send my kid to school on that road.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris BlackCyclists may us full lane. Put a sign on it.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
CindyOnly if marked as no parking
ReplyAgree3 years ago
sacredsalvageI use these when I have to (Sawmill road for instance). Not my preference because cars still plan to pass at full speed.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
cox8321I do use routes like this but prefer not to
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Chris ParninI think the best example of a good version of this is Brooks Road.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Karen LuseI agree with @ElizabethKeyser. If it's wide enough and not too busy, I will use the road.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
Elizabeth KeyserWould prefer markings to make sure cars know they are expected to share the road, but if the road is wide enough I don't feel nervous using it.
ReplyAgree3 years ago
thebigbeatdownNot without markings
ReplyAgree3 years ago